Information and support for caregivers of IDA patients

Are you a parent or caregiver for someone who has been diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia (IDA)?

If so, we’re here to explain IDA, answer your questions about its causes and symptoms, discuss treatment options, and connect you with valuable resources. We’ll also make suggestions for encouraging the patient along their IDA journey.

  • The person I am caring for is a:
  • CHILD (aged 1-17)
  • ADULT (aged 18+)
  • What is Iron Deficiency Anemia and what are its common symptoms?

    IDA is a form of anemia that can develop when someone is consuming too little iron, or when their body is losing—or unable to properly absorb—iron.

    • IDA interferes with the creation and function of red blood cells
    • Those cells contain hemoglobin, a protein that helps carry oxygen from the lungs to cells throughout the body
    • As a result, IDA prevents the body from receiving sufficient oxygen

    Causes of IDA in children include:

    • Too little dietary iron
    • Limited absorption of dietary iron
    • GI (gastrointestinal) conditions
    • Heavy menstrual bleeding: Ask your daughter about her menstrual flow. If it’s heavy, consider talking to her doctor
    • Renal (kidney) disease
    • Cancer

    Signs and symptoms of IDA in children include:

    • Fatigue or weakness
    • Dizziness
    • Shortness of breath
    • Pica (unusual cravings for non-food or low-nutrient substances such as ice, dirt, or paint)

    It’s also possible, however, that IDA patients will exhibit no signs or symptoms.

  • What treatment options are available?

    Oral iron supplements

    • Even in healthy patients, the digestive tract can only absorb a small portion—less than 10%—of oral iron. Therefore, the body might not get the full dose needed
    • Oral iron can also cause hard-to-tolerate side effects
    • As a result, oral iron may not be suitable for some children with IDA

    IV iron

    • If oral iron is inadequate or not well tolerated, IV iron may help your child
    • With IV iron, 100% of iron is delivered directly into the bloodstream through a vein
  • What is Injectafer?

    Injectafer is an IV iron delivered via infusion directly into the bloodstream to provide the most iron per course of treatment.* It is FDA-approved to treat IDA in:

    • adults and children (aged 1 and older) for whom oral iron treatments haven’t worked or who couldn’t tolerate the side effects
    • adults with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease

    Injectafer is well studied and widely used. It has been proven safe in clinical studies with more than 8800 people and used to treat more than 1.7 million people in the United States alone.

    *1 course of treatment with Injectafer is 2 doses of up to 750 mg separated by at least 7 days.
  • How do I prepare my child for an infusion?

    While infusions are available at some doctors’ offices, they are more typically administered at a specially equipped and staffed medical facility known as an infusion center.

    Hematologists (blood specialists) and oncologists (cancer specialists) frequently have experience treating IDA. Therefore, the infusion center is often a hematology or oncology clinic.

    To find a facility that provides Injectafer, use this Injectafer Infusion Center Locator.

    Before the infusion:

    • Call ahead to confirm that the center provides Injectafer IV iron
    • Dress your child comfortably
    • Let them eat normally, since there are no special dietary requirements
    • Bring your child’s insurance card (if they have one) and any other information the doctor has requested

    During and after the infusion, which typically takes about 15 minutes, a doctor or nurse will monitor your child’s response.

    • Children take cues from their parents, so try to be relaxed and calm. They may be comforted by a favorite toy, entertainment as a distraction, or a reward to look forward to

    Children fare better when they are willing and active participants in their IDA treatment. Therefore, you should communicate with your child openly and honestly about their IDA and how the two of you—working together with your healthcare providers—can manage it:

    • Let them know that IDA is common and treatable
    • Explain their treatment plan in detailed, easy-to-understand language
    • Reassure them that their treatment may help them

    Injectafer is given in 2 doses at least 7 days apart. Be sure your child completes their full course of treatment.

    Pediatric Caregiver Brochure
  • What is Iron Deficiency Anemia and what are its effects?

    IDA is a form of anemia that can develop when someone is consuming too little iron, or when their body is losing—or unable to properly absorb—iron.

    • IDA interferes with the creation and function of red blood cells
    • Those cells contain hemoglobin, a protein that helps carry oxygen from the lungs to cells throughout the body
    • As a result, IDA prevents the body from receiving sufficient oxygen

    Signs and symptoms of IDA in adults include:

    • Headaches
    • Shortness of breath
    • Chest pain
    • Pale or yellow skin
    • Fatigue

    It’s also possible, however, that IDA patients will exhibit no signs or symptoms.

  • What treatment options are available?

    Oral iron supplements

    • Even in healthy patients, the digestive tract can only absorb a small portion—less than 10%—of oral iron. Therefore, the body might not get the full dose needed
    • Oral iron can also cause hard-to-tolerate side effects
    • As a result, oral iron may not be suitable for some adult patients with IDA

    IV iron

    • If oral iron is inadequate or not well tolerated, IV iron may help
    • It delivers 100% of its iron directly into the blood stream, usually with minimal side effects
  • How does Injectafer help with IDA?

    Injectafer is an IV iron delivered via infusion directly into the bloodstream to provide the most iron per course of treatment.* It is FDA-approved to treat IDA in:

    • adults and children (aged 1 and older) for whom oral iron treatments haven’t worked or who couldn’t tolerate the side effects
    • adults with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease

    Injectafer is well studied and widely used. It has been proven safe in clinical studies with more than 8800 people and used to treat more than 1.7 million people in the United States alone.

    *1 course of treatment with Injectafer is 2 doses of up to 750 mg separated by at least 7 days.
  • How do I prepare a loved one for an infusion?

    While infusions are available at some doctors’ offices, they are more typically administered at a specially equipped and staffed medical facility known as an infusion center.

    Hematologists (blood specialists) and oncologists (cancer specialists) frequently have experience treating IDA. Therefore, the infusion center is often a hematology or oncology clinic.

    To find a facility that provides Injectafer, use this Injectafer Infusion Center Locator.

    Before the infusion:

    • Call ahead to confirm that the center provides Injectafer IV iron
    • Encourage the patient to dress comfortably
    • Let them eat normally, since there are no special dietary requirements
    • Bring their insurance card, photo ID, and any other information the doctor has requested

    During and after the infusion, which typically takes about 15 minutes, a doctor or nurse will monitor their response.

    Patients fare better when they are willing and active participants in their IDA treatment. Therefore, you should communicate openly and honestly about their IDA and how the two of you—working together with your healthcare providers—can manage it:

    • Let them know that IDA is common and treatable
    • Explain their treatment plan in detailed, easy-to-understand language
    • Reassure them that their treatment may help them

    Injectafer is given in 2 doses at least 7 days apart. Be sure the patient completes their full course of treatment.

    Patient Brochure

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The information on this website should not take the place of talking with your doctor or healthcare professional.
If you have any questions about your condition, or if you want more information about IDA or Injectafer,
talk to your doctor. Only your doctor can decide if Injectafer is right for you.

Injectafer® (ferric carboxymaltose injection) is available by prescription only. Ask your doctor or healthcare provider if Injectafer is right for you.

What is Injectafer?

Injectafer is a prescription iron replacement medicine administered only by or under the supervision of your healthcare provider. Injectafer is injected into your vein to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults and pediatric patients 1 year of age and older. Injectafer should be used only if you have not responded well to treatment with oral iron, or if you are intolerant to oral iron treatment. It is also used to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis.

 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Who should not receive Injectafer?

You should not receive Injectafer if you are allergic to ferric carboxymaltose or any of the other ingredients in Injectafer. The active ingredient in Injectafer is ferric carboxymaltose, the inactive ingredients are: water for injection, sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid.

What should I tell my doctor or healthcare provider before receiving Injectafer?

Before you receive Injectafer, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have had an allergic reaction to iron given intravenously (into your vein), including Injectafer, or to other non-oral iron treatments
  • If you have, or have previously experienced, iron overload, or if your body has difficulty using iron appropriately
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Injectafer will harm your unborn baby. Your healthcare provider will decide if it is safe for you to take Injectafer
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breast feed. Injectafer passes into your breast milk. It is unknown whether Injectafer would pose a risk to your baby. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during treatment with Injectafer

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

How will I receive Injectafer?

Injectafer is given intravenously (into your vein) by your healthcare provider in 2 doses at least 7 days apart.

What are the possible side effects of Injectafer?

Injectafer can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Serious allergic reactions that may be life-threatening, including shock, low blood pressure, loss of consciousness, and death. Your doctor or healthcare provider will monitor you for signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction during and after each dose of Injectafer for at least 30 minutes. Other serious allergic reactions include itching, rash, hives, wheezing, or low blood pressure. You should report any signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction to Injectafer, in particular rashes, shortness of breath, and wheezing to your doctor or healthcare provider
  • High blood pressure, sometimes with facial flushing, dizziness, or nausea, has been seen during treatment with Injectafer. This increase in blood pressure typically resolves within 30 minutes. Your doctor or healthcare provider will monitor you for signs and symptoms of an increase in blood pressure following each use of Injectafer

Other serious side effects that have been reported include rash, difficulty breathing, itching, rapid heartbeat, fever, chest discomfort, chills, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue, back pain, muscle aches, and fainting.

The most common side effects of Injectafer include:

  • In adults: nausea, high blood pressure, flushing, pain or bruising at the injection site, skin redness, low levels of phosphorous in your blood, and dizziness. Potentially long-lasting brown staining of skin near the injection site may occur if Injectafer leaks out of the vein
  • In children: low levels of phosphorous in your blood, pain or bruising at the injection site, rash, headache, and vomiting

Excessive amounts of Injectafer may lead to a condition called iron overload, which is a buildup of iron and may be harmful.

These are not all of the possible side effects of Injectafer.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

General information about Injectafer

Injectafer may impact laboratory tests that measure iron in your blood for 24 hours after receiving Injectafer. Let your healthcare provider and laboratory staff know if you have received Injectafer within 24 hours of having blood tests.

To report side effects, contact American Regent at 1-800-734-9236 or E-mail: pv@americanregent.com or Fax: 1-610-650-0170.

You may also report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more about Injectafer, talk with your healthcare provider or pharmacist. The FDA-approved product labeling can be found at www.injectafer.com/pdf/pi.pdf or call 1-800-645-1706.

Please see Full Prescribing Information for Injectafer, including the bolded WARNING regarding hypersensitivity.

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