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Your Lab Results and Potential Treatment Options

Your lab results are the results of your blood test. They are used to diagnose iron deficiency anemia (IDA)
and monitor and manage your condition during treatment. If you have any questions about your condition
or if you want more information about IDA, talk to your doctor. Only your doctor can diagnose IDA. 

Common tests for diagnosing IDA-static

Common tests for diagnosing IDA

Click on each to learn more:

Hemoglobin (Hb)

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Hemoglobin (Hb)

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Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. You can develop anemia when there are not enough red blood cells, or when the cells are not working properly.

Ferritin

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Ferritin

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Ferritin is a protein inside your cells that stores iron. It allows your body to use the iron when it needs it. A ferritin test indirectly measures the amount of iron in your blood.

 

 

Transferrin saturation (TSAT)

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Transferrin saturation (TSAT)

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Transferrin is a protein responsible for transporting iron through your body. TSAT measures the amount of iron that is immediately available to produce red blood cells.

 

 

Knowing that IDA may be associated with different diseases or conditions, your doctor may need to do additional tests to confirm an IDA diagnosis. Click here to see the different diseases and conditions.

Common laboratory markers to monitor IDA

Common lab markers to monitor IDA

Keep in mind this chart shows "normal" values, but these can vary for a number of reasons,
depending on the person, their condition(s) and where the test is taken. That's why it's important
to discuss these lab results and numbers with your doctor.

Lab Markers
Anemia test value table  Male - Normal Values
Anemia test value table  Female - Normal Values

Hemoglobin (Hb)
Ferritin
Transferrin saturation (TSAT)

13.8 - 17.2 g/dL
12 - 300 ng/mL
20% - 50%

12.1 - 15.1 g/dL
12 - 150 ng/mL
20% - 50%
Lab Markers
Anemia test value table Male -
Normal Values
Anemia test value table Female -
Normal Values
Hemoglobin (Hb)
13.8 - 17.2 g/dL
12.1- 15.1 g/dL
Ferritin
12 - 300 ng/mL
12 - 150 ng/mL
Transferrin saturation (TSAT)
20% - 50%
20% - 50%

IDA is serious, but it can be treated

IDA can be serious, so talk to your doctor

Only your doctor can diagnose IDA. You should be discussing with your doctor why you may have IDA. He or she can use your lab results to diagnose you with IDA, and in looking at your medical history, your doctor may be able to find out what is causing your IDA, and treat that condition to help you feel better. This could help with finding the right treatment for you.

If you've been taking oral iron and it isn't working for you, you and your doctor may have discussed an intravenous (IV) iron treatment like Injectafer. Both oral iron and IV iron are common treatment options.

About Oral And IV Iron-static

 

About IV Iron

IDA sometimes requires IV iron therapy.
This kind of treatment is usually done in an infusion center.


Some of the reasons your doctor may prescribe
IV iron to treat your IDA could include:

  • Oral iron is not absorbing well in the
    digestive system.
  • Blood loss—which can be caused by a number
    of things including,but not limited to, heavy
    periods, major surgery or physical trauma,
    and some gastrointestinal diseases.

WITH IV IRON,
100% OF IRON
IS DELIVERED INTO
THE BLOODSTREAM

Your doctor will most likely prescribe an oral iron treatment for you first.

For some people with IDA,iron pills are not suitable.
There are several resons why this might be.
The most common reasons are:

  • Iron in oral form can cause hard-to-tolerate
    side effects.
  • Oral iron can fail to replenish iron levels
    to where the body needs them because the
    digestive system has trouble to absorbing it

EVEN IN HEALTHY PATIENTS,
LESS THAN 10%
OF ORAL IRON IS ABSORBED*

*Oral iron is typically taken in 300 mg or 320 mg tablets 3-4 times a day. The body is unable to absorb that much iron in the digestive tract at one time, so iron repletion may be possible in smaller oral iron doses over time.

IDA sometimes requires IV iron therapy.
This kind of treatment is usually done in an infusion center.


Some of the reasons your doctor may prescribe
IV iron to treat your IDA could include:

  • Oral iron is not absorbing well in the
    digestive system.
  • Blood loss—which can be caused by a number
    of things including,but not limited to, heavy
    periods, major surgery or physical trauma,
    and some gastrointestinal diseases.

WITH IV IRON,
100% OF IRON
IS DELIVERED INTO
THE BLOODSTREAM

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Not actual patient or healthcare professional. Individual results may vary.

The information on this website should not take the place of talking with your doctor or healthcare professional. If you have any questions about your condition, or if you want more information about IDA or Injectafer, talk to your doctor. Only your doctor can decide if Injectafer is right for you.

NEXT - Learn more about Injectafer, a potential IV iron treatment option for IDA

Learn more about Injectafer, a potential IV iron treatment option for IDA

Important Safety Information

Injectafer® (ferric carboxymaltose injection) is available by prescription only. Ask your doctor or healthcare provider if Injectafer is right for you.

What is Injectafer?

Injectafer is a prescription iron replacement medicine administered only by or under the supervision of your healthcare provider. Injectafer is injected into your vein to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults. Injectafer should be used only if you have not responded well to treatment with oral iron, or if you are intolerant to oral iron treatment. It is also used to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis.

It is not known if Injectafer is safe and effective for use in children.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Who should not receive Injectafer?

You should not receive Injectafer if you are allergic to ferric carboxymaltose or any of the other ingredients in Injectafer. The active ingredient in Injectafer is ferric carboxymaltose, the inactive ingredients are: water for injection, sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid.

What should I tell my doctor or healthcare provider before receiving Injectafer?

Before you receive Injectafer, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have had an allergic reaction to iron given intravenously (into your vein), including Injectafer, or to other non-oral iron treatments
  • If you have, or have previously experienced, iron overload, or if your body has difficulty using iron appropriately
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Injectafer will harm your unborn baby. Your healthcare provider will decide if it is safe for you to take Injectafer
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breast feed. Injectafer passes into your breast milk. It is unknown whether Injectafer would pose a risk to your baby. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during treatment with Injectafer.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

What are the possible side effects of Injectafer?

Injectafer can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Serious allergic reactions that may be life-threatening, including shock, low blood pressure, loss of consciousness, and death. Your doctor or healthcare provider will monitor you for signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction during and after each dose of Injectafer for at least 30 minutes. Other serious allergic reactions include itching, rash, hives, wheezing, or low blood pressure. You should report any signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction to Injectafer, in particular rashes, shortness of breath and wheezing to your doctor or healthcare provider.
  • High blood pressure, sometimes with facial flushing, dizziness, or nausea, has been seen during treatment with Injectafer. This increase in blood pressure typically resolves within 30 minutes. Your doctor or healthcare provider will monitor you for signs and symptoms of an increase in blood pressure following each use of Injectafer.

Other serious side effects that have been reported include rash, difficulty breathing, itching, rapid heartbeat, fever, chest discomfort, chills, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue, back pain, muscle aches, and fainting.

The most common side effects of Injectafer include:

  • Nausea, high blood pressure, flushing, low levels of phosphorous in your blood, dizziness, vomiting, headache, an increase in certain liver enzymes, and pain or bruising at the injection site. Potentially long-lasting brown staining of skin near the injection site may occur if Injectafer leaks out of the vein.

Excessive amounts of Injectafer may lead to a condition called iron overload, which is a buildup of iron and may be harmful.

These are not all of the possible side effects of Injectafer.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

General information about Injectafer

Injectafer may impact laboratory tests that measure iron in your blood for 24 hours after receiving Injectafer. Let your healthcare provider and laboratory staff know if you have received Injectafer within 24 hours of having blood tests.

To report side effects, contact American Regent at 1-800-734-9236 or E-mail: pv@luitpold.com or Fax: 1-610-650-0170.

You may also report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more about Injectafer, talk with your healthcare provider or pharmacist. The FDA-approved product labeling can be found at http://www.injectafer.com/pdf/pi.pdf or call 1-800-645-1706.

Please see Full Prescribing Information for Injectafer.